The Farm
Circle h Farm is a family-operated organic farm located on Lost Creek, near Dexter, in the
Southern Willamette Valley. Run by a brother and sister team, the Circle h name comes from
our great-grandparents who owned the land the farm is on today. They used a circle h brand on
their cattle. We are privileged to be one of the passing generations to work this beautiful land.
Our philosophy is to treat the land well, and it will continue providing for the generations to
come.

We are certified organic because we want to give the land the respect it deserves. Synthesized
additives don't have a place in the natural beauty of vibrant life. We sell our products locally. We
drive to Eugene, Oregon for weekly markets, but love selling to community members that live
even closer than Eugene.
Our Carbon Footprint

Circle h Farm operates off the
electric grid! (With the exception of
the "office.") Our irrigation system
uses solar panels to pump water to
a tank at the high point of the farm.
From there it is distributed by
gravity to the fields.

We use an earthen root cellar to
keep produce cool after it is
harvested - no electricity needed!

Most of our CSA customers live
within 3 miles of the farm. Many
even bike or walk to pick up their
produce.

We use a thermsyphon to heat the
bench under our germinating seeds
and young seedlings. This means
no electricity needed to circulate
the warm water that keeps our
starts safe from spring frosts.   

We must not use the world as though
we created it ourselves.
         Wendell Berry,
              "The Gift of Good Land"


Man did not weave the web of life, he
is merely a strand in it.
                 commonly attributed   
                      to Chief Seattle
Our Strategies for Organic Production

Organic certification ensures a healthy growing process
- one that considers the whole growing system. An
organic fruit or vegetable could be raised in a lab if
certification only ensured the product tissue passes
certain tests of what it does or does not contain.
Instead, organic farms have more of an ecosystem
approach, utilizing healthy soil, water and air, plus
native plants and animals to maximize their edible plant
production. Being certified organic means rotating crops
to ensure healthy soil and help keep pests in balance. It
also means using well composted manures to ensure
harmful bacteria are not contaminating the fields.
Organic farms are also required to buy organic seed,
which supports other organic farms. (Read more at
Oregon Tilth's website.) Small farms especially utilize
these practices and have very diverse crops. Local farm
practices are inspected by you, the consumer, ensuring
the quality you want.

Nutrient management and
soil building are the most
important tasks on an organic farm. We grow good dirt
first, so we can grow good vegetables. Good soil has
organic material, microbes, air space and balanced
nutrition. Adding compost and manure is important,
and we do as much of this as we can in the winter
months. But most important is growing a healthy cover
crop that creates organic material on site (we don't
have to haul it from the neighborhood barns). Deep
roots bring up micronutrients, break up heavy soils,
and add organic material to feed the microbes. The
microbes in turn play an important role in feeding the
next season's plants.

Organic
pest control often involves trying to focus on
the good side of damaging creatures. Voles do some of
the farm's worst damage, along with cucumber beetles
and flea beetles. The best protection from vole
destruction is to plant more than we need and offer the
critters their share for helping turn the soil, mix
nutrients, and decompose organic material. We manage
native plants around our fields to encourage native
beneficial insects and birds that prey on the insects that
damage our crops. This buffer space is also habitat for
native pollinators.

Most hungry flying insects and larvae can be deterred
with floating row covers. If this lightweight cloth is
carefully sealed by burying it all around the edge of the
row, young plants are safe from the bugs until they are
growing vigorously enough to be uncovered and fend
for themselves.
love the earth and the animals, despise riches, give alms to every
one that asks, stand up for the stupid and the crazy, devote
your income and labor to others, hate tyrants, argue not
concerning god....go freely with powerful uneducated persons and
with the young and with the mothers of families.....re-examine all
you have been told at school or church or in any book, dismiss
whatever insults your own soul, and your very flesh shall be a
great poem
                                     - Walt Whitman